Prisoner of war | Janneke Jobsis Brown

Luther Prunty’s Red Blanket, Symbol of Gratitude after World War II

Luther Prunty’s Red Blanket, Symbol of Gratitude after World War II
A Blanket of Gratitude A red blanket of comfort followed Luther Prunty through the hell of WWII Japanese concentration camp survival. As he nears the century mark of life, home in Jacksboro, Texas, he still treasures the same blanket. At one time the Chinese  red blanket offered him the simple protection of not being considered AWOL, when over-extending his leave in Singapore.  The blanket which hid him from American MP’s as he returned to base, became a symbol of the extreme of protection and courage necessary for survival of all that came after, at the hands of the Japanese: Defeat in the...
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(3) Indonesia, “Indie” August 13, 1945, My “Friends” Waited

(3) Indonesia, “Indie” August 13, 1945, My “Friends” Waited
Sixty-six years ago, a tense world waited. Civilians and POW’s held in Japanese slave labor operations and concentration camps continued in a daze of starvation and deprivation. Deaths accelerated by the day. Children, women and men held in the camps did not know that on: August 6, the Atom bomb had  been dropped on Hiroshima August 7, 1945 Foreign Minister Shigenori Togo of Japan sent a coded telegram to his ambassador in Moscow. Japan had proposed a peace agreement to the Soviet Union, and wanted an answer (Haseqawa, 2006). August 9, 1945 The Atom bomb was dropped on Nagasaki. Due to the Nagasaki...
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Heroism, Heimwee- homecoming hero, what feeds you?

Heroism, Heimwee- homecoming hero, what feeds you?
Heimwee- homecoming hero, what feeds you? “Just appreciate us. And consider us survivors, not heroes. I am not a hero; I’m strictly a survivor.“ from Veteran Wilbur Sharpe, this Memorial Day about being a POW in Germany from June 1943 to Jan. 21, 1945 (Ashburn Patch Newspaper, Ashburn, VA). He suffered acute hardshiop. Months after liberation to the Russian allies and enroute back to American allies, he still weighted only 94 pounds.  In the POW camp, Red Cross packages save their lives. Red Cross packages were turned over to the prisoners every 10 days, after the German captors,...
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