In Darkness, movie director Agnieszka Holland addresses the Banality of Evil

In Darkness, movie director Agnieszka Holland addresses the Banality of Evil
If you could have any faith at all,  after what you had been through… then I could have faith too. words to my Dad How have you struggled with faith? Have you ever considered that such struggles could express a great deal of faith, rather than lack of faith?   The tragic concept of “The Banality of Evil” struck me as I read Christianity Today‘s interview with Agnieszka Holland, director of the amazing foreign film In Darkness.  In Darkness focuses on WWII, the Holocaust, and  Leopold Socha, a Polish sewer worker and petty thief who finds Jewish people hiding in the...
read more

Excelelnt, Excellent—The Critic

Excelelnt, Excellent—The Critic
I squirm inside (in a healing way I hope) when I see how the intro to the first Excellent, Excellent, Excellent  post  appears on-line. It starts with these words…. “She is right,” said my teacher. “Her work and ability is excellent, excellent, excellent.”   Its as if I felt SECURE writing of INSECURITY  but embarrassed to have the first words readers see to be “She is right,” said my teacher. “Her work and ability is excellent, excellent, excellent.”   So I get to squirm into this awareness: It is okay to celebrate those times that people in God’s world affirm...
read more

Excellent, Excellent Moments

Excellent, Excellent Moments
What happens  when I approach survivors to do research for my pending novel, Shadows, who are not used to talking? Survivors are probably not thinking to themselves excellent, excellent, excellent at such a time, I know. Yet somehow it all works out. I receive moments, both of us softening again. Softening that which had been hardened pain for so long. We start like barnacles on the bottom of a ship, seemingly impossible to scrape off, infecting every lake it goes to, risking barnacles on every ship, kayak or boat that enters the new lake. Yet, with caring faith-filled talk the barnacles start to come...
read more

Excellent, Excellent, Excellent

Excellent, Excellent, Excellent
“Excellent, excellent, excellent” I scrawled on my second grade self-report, in Spanish Fork, Utah. Mama went to school for the whole report card and progress report. “She is right,” said my teacher. “Her work and ability is excellent, excellent, excellent.” By the time of this exchange, my excellent, excellent, excellent seven year old self  had already lost two beloved countries (the Netherlands and Iran), many family and friends. My encouraging second-grade teacher was at the fifth elementary school of my young life. Today this memory and report of my teacher’s words fill me with...
read more

Open Door

Open Door
Open the Door I grew up with words like this, “It’s too terrible to tell you,  it’s too much. I do not hate the Japanese; they were cruel to each other too.” Those words came from my father, every time I asked him what it was like to survive WWII in the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia). He never told me. Every survivor of WWII has differences in how they survive and thrive… After. For my father it was never to talk about 1942 -1945,  except occasionally to cousins who also survived, or to a combat-survivor soldier. My father’s “combat” survival was in Japanese...
read more

Locked Door

Locked Door
Open a Locked Door of pain? Is there meaning behind a Locked Door? Is there a gift behind a Locked Door? What about the gift of meaning? these may be the TOUGHEST QUESTIONS for survivors of World War II and other trauma If Trauma has a Gift (by Janneke Jobsis Brown) If trauma has a gift And the gift is bringing meaning to life. The gift is Too expensive Its cost is astronomical People pay with their lives The wounds are deep, as deep as the soul. The very Spirit suffers, hides wounds, yearns for healing If meaning is the gift of trauma Is the cost then, a broken spirit?   We hope and pray not. ...
read more

« Previous Entries Next Entries »